How to Sew Y Seams

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Duration: 33:12

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Depending on how your quilt block or overall design comes together, a Y seam might be an important step in the construction. Toby Lischko shows you how to sew Y-seams that have all of the seams matching perfect and laying flat.

Y-Seam Tips

Before you can learn how to sew Y-seams you must first understand what they are. Toby shows an example quilt pattern, her Eden pattern, which is a design that utilizes Y-seams. She begins by showing how to cut out the pieces for the example quilt block, giving tips on how to accurately use templates with a small rotary cutter.

She then lays out several of the pieces from that pattern and explains how when they get sewn together, rather than being stitched in a straight line, three pieces and their seam allowances will come together into a Y-shape. She begins demonstrating how to sew y-seams by sewing together the first two pieces. She explains where to start and stop stitching in order to allow room for the third piece to be attached.

After every step of this Y-seam process you can either set your seam and then press with an iron, or simply finger press and then press with an iron at the end. Toby then shows how to stitch the last piece in place, matching up the seam allowances that are all coming together. She again explains where to start and stop stitching and gives tips for checking you stitches with a pin prior to sewing.

Once the small sections from the block are constructed, Toby shows how to assemble more of the block, which also includes showing how to sew y-seams that are slightly larger. While learning how to sew a Y-seam might be intimidating, once practiced several times you will find that it is a doable technique that should never make you shy away from a quilt block or design. Once you learn this technique, get more fun ideas including how to incorporate decorative stitches into your next project.