Organizing Your Sewing Room Part 4: Kits & Projects

When we had moved 8 years ago I thought it was a brilliant idea to separate all of my children’s possessions into individual containers. That way when they left home, they could just take them with. Wrong! Not only did they not take the totes then, they have no interest in taking them ever! I had saved homework from every grade, plus class photos, toys, baby blankets – just about anything I was sentimental about.

kit tub opened resized You’re probably wondering how this fits into quilting and organizing your sewing room. Well, I was rummaging through my inventory of well-marked containers (thinking it was time to start sneaking them into the kids’ homes) when I came across one marked “kits.” I thought I must have mismarked this one, mistakenly writing a “t” instead of a “d” for “kids.” I opened it up and to my amazement found a whole stash of quilting kits! It wasn’t kid stuff after all, but rather some of my most treasured quilting possessions! So treasured I didn’t even realize they were missing…

It was amazing! I felt like it was my birthday; all of these wonderful kits were as new to me as the day I purchased them. It was quite clear though that this was not a great method for storing all these valuable kits and fabrics. My husband is known for cleaning out boxes and containers without ever looking in them. His theory is, “If you haven’t missed it, it isn’t of value.” When stored in solid-colored containers that don’t easily show the contents, I risk having them sold at garage sales, donated, or simply thrown away. One of my friends had her quilting wares accidentally donated to a local charity, and my dear aunt had her treasures accidentally thrown into a dumpster. (Including finished quilt tops, numerous kits, and a sewing machine – could you imagine!)

Moral of the story: when storing kits, finished quilt tops and UFOs (unfinished objects), aim to keep them visible so you don’t forget about them (or accidentally throw them away!). Here are some of my favorite tips and methods for storage.

octopus hangar resized img

Laundry Hangers

Those circular laundry hangers that fold up and have clothes pins on each end are great for hanging smaller items like kits. It keeps them out in the open, visible, and organized. I went out and purchased a cute one that looked like an octopus from IKEA, but soon found this one wasn’t strong enough to hold more than a few kits at a time no matter how many times I tried. I ended up giving it to my daughter to hang baby clothes on. Oh well.

kit basket as decor resized

Decorative Baskets

Another fun way to store kits is to keep them in decorative baskets. They add a pretty touch to the sewing room and allow you to easily alternate the kits you keep within arm’s reach. As I work on one kit, I replace the basket with a new kit and keep cycling through. This has been one of my favorite ideas; it adds color to my studio and is constantly changing.

kit blocks done img

Clear Plastic Containers

While shopping at a local craft store I found the perfect 9×9 and 12×12 inch plastic containers. They are just the right size for my kits and completed blocks. Another huge plus is that they can be purchased in a rolling cart. Imagine a cart just for kit and completed block storage. The containers are also large enough so you can include the book or pattern you are using as well. If you decide not to purchase the rolling cart, they stack nicely on their own.

hand dyes on hanger resized img

Pants Hangers

If you have closet space available (what a luxury!), you may consider claiming some for your kits and fabrics. I find pants hangers amazingly useful. I generally will put my kit fabric and pattern into a gallon baggie, and then hang the baggie on a pants hangar (the kind with clips). Sometimes you can hang several baggies on one hangar. I have also used the non-clip hangers for my hand-dyed fabrics and completed quilt tops awaiting quilting. Some of your area discount department stores carry extra-large plastic hangers that work great for quilt tops as well.

These are just a handful of ideas and I’m sure there are more out there! How do you store and organize your kits, projects, and UFOs? Leave us a comment or head on over to Facebook to share your own tips.

Happy quilting!

More in this Series:
Organizing Your Sewing Room Part 1: Thread & Bobbins
Organizing Your Sewing Room Part 2: Fabric
Organizing Your Sewing Room Part 3: Quilting Tools

Related Video:

How to Store Quilting Supplies

Get in touch! Leave a comment or email editor@nationalquilterscircle.com.


Become a National Quilters Circle Premium Member
Discussion
  • (will not be published)

15 Responses to “Organizing Your Sewing Room Part 4: Kits & Projects”
  1. Lisa

    I use the clear plastic boxes (like the one shown with the dog quilt square in it) and love that they can be easily stacked on my closet shelf until I am ready. I use a piece of painter’s tape and a sharpie to write what the project it so that I don’t have to pull each one out to see what it is. I used to use the gallon ziplock method but found they fell over if not in a box and got scrunched up so if a project was partially done every time I opened the packet, I had to start by pressing again. 🙁 I still use baggies for small parts but find the boxes easier for projects.

    Reply
    • Jo Elizabeth Poole

      Storing small projects in baggies? To keep them from falling over to one side or other use a plain brown box, no wider than the baggies you are using. Set the box on its side leaving the opening fully acceptable. Stack the filled baggies in it. They will not fall, and you can easily see what is in them.

      Reply
  2. BJ

    Way to store small Quilts & wall hangings. Cover Swim Noodles with muslin and roll quilts on. Stand up in closet to store.

    Reply
  3. Maureen Singleton

    I use pool noodles to carry and store unfinished projects to classes so the don’t need to be ironed before you start!

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi Sandy. I believe IKEA has good prices, though I do not know if they are always the least expensive. I used to live in a town that didn’t have an IKEA anywhere near by and I got all of my sewing room organizing supplies at big box stores like Walmart and Target.
      Hope this helps!

      Reply
  4. Ro Curtis

    For homes WITHOUT children!
    * Pegboards: you can see it – easily within reach – for scissors to spare baggies – rulers – small devices – mine’s right next to the cutting table
    * Chain & dowels: mount 2 hooks high on the wall – hang cheap/large opening chain from the hooks – slide dowels thru the same chain loop down on each chain – & VOILA! Slide old toilet paper – wrapping paper – or paper towel rolls you’ve wrapped trim/lace/fringe on – & you have all your trims/etc. in plain sight – where you can easily access it. Best part is NOT using all those boxes/other storage methods – which means having to dig thru to find what you need & not wasting horizontal storage space on shelves/etc.

    Reply
  5. Ingrid Langhorst

    I went to a pizza store that uses plain white boxes and purchased 12 of them. I can attach a plastic sleeve and in it put a sheet with the name of the project. Each box is large enough to hold my fabric and blocks for one project. Another advantage is that the sunlight can’t reach the fabric. They also stack very well.

    Reply
  6. Diana

    Thank you. My sewing room is such a wreck that I haven’t sewn before Christmas 2016. A whole year without quilting. I was just sitting here lamenting my lack of interest in getting it in order, sending up a mini prayer for helpb when I received your email. It was the kick in the pants yhat I needed.
    Diana

    Reply
  7. Laurie

    I have a nice quality entertainment center that no longer works with today’s TVs. I repurposed it to hold unfinished projects and fabric. (Of course, it’s no longer in the living room!) I’ve also asked myself why I have so many unfinished projects. Looks like I need to get projects done before I move on. :{

    Reply
  8. Debra_Australia

    For smaller projects/kits I use the foldable plastic shoe boxes to store the fabrics and pattern, they stack well on shelves. To finally get your children to take their belongings – ie all that memorabilia you have kept, pack it into one or more packing boxes cover with wrapping paper and present to them on a birthday or Christmas as a “This is your Life” or “Memory Box”.

    Reply
    • Amy Lee

      A great idea of how to get kids to take their possessions back. Less stuff means better organization. They won’t turn down a gift like that. Love some od these ideas too. Cannot use a pegboard with family members that will grab stuff for their needs without thought.

      Reply