Quilting in Sections

Ask an Expert Banner NQC

Would you advise quilting in sections on a single bed quilt with border for a beginner with an old sewing machine?



Submitted by Denise


NQC Answer

Hi,

Yes, I would recommend quilting in sections. When I quilted my first quilt it was a bed size quilt done on a basic Brother machine. I started in the middle and worked my way toward one edge, then went back to the middle and worked my way toward the other edge. I then repeated the process to again work from the middle to the top and then to the bottom. Essentially I quilted in quadrants.

This was the easiest way for me to ensure my backing fabric didn’t get puckers, and was also an easier way for me to maneuver the quilt on my machine.

Hope this helps!

Ashley

Do you have a quilting question you’d like answered by an expert? Email your question to editor@nationalquilterscircle.com or reach out to us on Facebook.

Please note: questions may be edited for clarity and relevance.

Discussion
  • (will not be published)

9 Responses to “Quilting in Sections”
  1. Diane Gunnard

    Ashley, if you are quilting in quarter sections, are you using the embroidery hoop also ?

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi Diane. Since I did my quilting on my machine I did not use a hoop at all, I simply pin basted my layers together.
      Hope this helps!

      Reply
  2. Mary Green

    I would have given a different answer…as I understood the question to be about making sections of the quilt, with top, batt, backing each, quilting them, and then joining them together. That is what I have done for large t-shirt quilts to be taken off to college dorms. These I assembled into strips with the backing extending about 6″ past each side. I quilted each 3-layer strip but did not get near any of the edges. Thus I had working room to machine sew the first two strips together, top layer only. I overlapped the batts in the seam, cut one line thru them both, removed the excess and hand whipped them together. Then I trimmed down the 2 backings so there was enough overlap that I could fold the one on top the other and hand stitch this seam shut.
    After all rows were joined, I machine quilted along the space where the strips joined tomfill in that previously unstitched gap.
    Then I sewed borders on to give stability to the sides. This involved placing the front border RST to the front, and sewing it down, thru all four layers (border, edge of quilt top, batt, backing). Once folded out, the final quilting is done in the borders.
    It sounds like a lot of work and many steps but sure beats struggling with the huge quilt on a home machine.
    You can email me if you have further questions…mgquilts@sbcglobal.net

    Reply
  3. Mary Green

    I would have given a different answer…as I understood the question to be about making sections of the quilt, with top, batt, backing each, quilting them, and then joining them together. That is what I have done for large t-shirt quilts to be taken off to college dorms. These I assembled into strips with the backing extending about 6″ past each side. I quilted each 3-layer strip but did not get near any of the edges. Thus I had working room to machine sew the first two strips together, top layer only. I overlapped the batts in the seam, cut one line thru them both, removed the excess and hand whipped them together. Then I trimmed down the 2 backings so there was enough overlap that I could fold the one on top the other and hand stitch this seam shut.
    After all rows were joined, I machine quilted along the space where the strips joined to fill in that previously unstitched gap.
    Then I sewed borders on to give stability to the sides. This involved placing the front border RST to the front, and sewing it down, thru all four layers (border, edge of quilt top, batt, backing). Once folded out, the final quilting is done in the borders.
    It sounds like a lot of work and many steps but sure beats struggling with the huge quilt on a home machine.
    You can email me if you have further questions…mgquilts@sbcglobal.net

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi, Betsy. I would suggest lots of practicing! Especially if you are wanting to do quilting using a free motion foot and you haven’t done a lot of it before- it can be an adjustment going from knowing how your machine feels when the feed dogs are moving the fabric to how it feels when you are in charge of moving the fabric.

      We also have an entire section of videos devoted to just quilting. I would recommend going through there, seeing what techniques you like and then trying them out!

      https://www.nationalquilterscircle.com/videos/quilting/

      Learn from experts to efficiently and effectively quilt your masterpiece. Follow along for tutorials on how to quilting lines and designs, like a pro.

      Reply
  4. Madeline

    I did a log cabin queen size quilt back in 1978. I forget how I did it. My son still has it. Thanks God today I saw a video explaining everything. He is going to have a new quilt.

    Reply